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Acquavella at 100: A History

1920s-1950s

In 1919, Nicholas M. Acquavella immigrates to the United States from Naples, Italy, and begins a private trade in Italian paintings in New York City. Opening his first gallery at 598 Madison Avenue, on the corner of Fifty-Seventh Street and Madison Avenue, he specializes in dealing with Italian Renaissance and Baroque paintings. Though the gallery will remain in this neighborhood of Manhattan for the next four decades, it changes locations several times.

Then known as N. M. Acquavella Galleries, the gallery earns a reputation as a leading dealer in Old Master paintings, introducing many important American museums and collectors to the masters of Italian Renaissance and Baroque painting. 

Numerous Old Master paintings sold by the gallery can today be found in prominent institutional collections, including masterworks by Artemisia Gentileschi, Guido Reni, and Zanobi Strozzi at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; two paintings by Corrado Giaquinto at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.; and a sculpture attributed to Donatello at the Detroit Institute of Arts. The monumental painting by Gentileschi, Esther before Ahaseurus, is one of only a half dozen paintings by the Renaissance master that today can be found in American museum collections.

1920s-1950s

Artemesia Gentileschi

Artemesia Gentileschi

Esther before Ahasuerus, 1628-30

Oil on canvas, 82 x 132 3/4 inches

The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Gift of Elinor Dorrance Ingersoll, 1969

Donatello

Donatello

Mother and Child, c. 1410-20

Gilt terracotta with polychrome decoration, 26 5/8 x 14 7/8 x 13 1/8 inches

Detroit Institute of Arts; Founders Society Purchase, Ralph Harman Booth Bequest Fund

Zanobi Strozzi

Zanobi Strozzi

The Nativity, c. 1433-34

Tempera and gold on wood, 7 3/8 x 17 1/8 inches

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Gift of May Dougherty King, 1983

Text Only

The gallery at 119 East Fifty-Seventh Street.

In 1947, while located at 38 East Fifty-Seventh Street, the gallery presents an exhibition of work by Giorgio de Chirico, the first exhibition at the gallery to focus on an artist from the nineteenth or twentieth century. Thirty paintings and two sculptures are on view. Other exhibitions in the 1930s and 1940s include Renaissance Portraits and numerous Old Master shows dedicated to Italian painters from the Quattracento through the seventeenth century. These exhibitions feature paintings by artists such as Bronzino, Canaletto, Guardi, Ferrari, Parmigianino, and Pontormo.

In the 1950s, the gallery moves to a new space, occupying the second floor of 119 East Fifty-Seventh Street. The distinctive, sixteenth-century styled building—designed with an elaborate, neo-Tudor façade, complete with old English tiles and an antique weathervane—was demolished in 1973.

1960s

In 1960, after graduating from Washington and Lee University and serving a stint in the army, Bill Acquavella joins his father in the gallery business. Noticing that the trade in Old Master paintings was slow, Bill develops an interest in dealing in Impressionist and modern paintings, which is encouraged by his father. 

1960s

Berea exhibition, 1963

Nicholas and Bill Acquavella at the gallery at 119 East Fifty-Seventh Street, 1963.

His first notable success in this market comes in 1965, when he reaches an agreement with the nieces of Pierre Bonnard. Buying seventeen paintings and taking thirteen on consignment, Bill and his father mount a show of the French master’s work. The gallery prints color catalogues, an uncommon practice for the time, and mails copies of the book to prominent collectors—Paul Mellon, Nelson Rockefeller, DeWitt Wallace, Norton Simon, and Douglas Dillon among them—though these collectors were not yet clients of the gallery. The gallery sells seventeen of these paintings by mail and begins relationships with some of the major collectors of the era. Today, several of the Bonnards from this 1965 exhibition can be found at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, among other private and public collections.

1960s

Bonnard, Nude in an Interior, 1935

Pierre Bonnard

Nude in an Interior, 1935

Oil on canvas, 52 ¾ x 27 ¼ inches

National Gallery of Art, Washington; Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

© 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Pierre Bonnard  The Dining Room, 1940-47

Pierre Bonnard

The Dining Room, 1940-47

Oil on canvas, 33 1/8 x 39 3/8 inches

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond; Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon

© 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Installation view of Pierre Bonnard, on view at Acquavella Galleries from November 9 - December 11, 1965.

Installation view of Bonnard, on view at Acquavella Galleries from November 9–December 11, 1965 at 119 East Fifty-Seventh Street.

Installation view of Bonnard show

Installation view of Bonnard, on view at Acquavella Galleries from November 9–December 11, 1965 at 119 East Fifty-Seventh Street.

Catalogue for Bonnard exhibition, 1965.

Catalogue for Bonnard exhibition, 1965.

Bonnard catalogue

Color plates in Bonnard exhibition catalogue, 1965.

The following year, in 1966, the gallery presents the paintings of the nineteenth-century French floral painter Henri Fantin-Latour, who was little known in the United States at the time. The show was a resounding success, as were the exhibition catalogues, which were popular with florists who used Fantin’s paintings for inspiration in their arrangements.

Alongside the major exhibitions of nineteenth and twentieth-century masters at their space on East Fifty-Seventh Street, the gallery begins to show contemporary European painters whose work is inspired by Impressionism—including Dimitrie Berea, Paul Maze, and André Dunoyer de Segonzac.

1960s

Photo of the Duveen building, 1964

The Duveen Brothers gallery at 18 East Seventy-Ninth Street in 1964.

Duveen showroom, 1954-55

The second floor galleries at Duveen Brothers on Seventy-Ninth Street, c. 1954-55.

With the success from the Bonnard and Fantin-Latour shows, the gallery acquires the French neo-classical townhouse at 18 East 79th Street in 1967, where the gallery is based today. Acquavella purchases the building from the collector and businessman, Norton Simon, in a deal involving two paintings as partial payment, including Fantin-Latour’s White and Pink Mallows in a Vase, which today is on view at the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, California. Simon himself had acquired the townhouse only two years prior, in 1965, when he had purchased the building from Duveen Brothers. The final outpost of the legendary London art firm, which had sold so many of the Old Masters, European furniture, and objets d’art to the American titans of industry of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Duveen finally closed its doors with Simon’s purchase of the inventory, expansive library, and elegant townhouse.

To inaugurate the new townhouse, Acquavella presents a major loan exhibition, Four Masters of Impressionism, in 1968, exhibiting seventy paintings by Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Alfred Sisley for the benefit of the Lenox Hill Hospital. The art historian François Daulte writes the catalogue introduction.

1960s

Four Masters of Impressionism install view

Four Masters of Impressionism on view at Acquavella Galleries from October 24–November 30, 1968.

Bill Acquavella at Four Masters of Impressionism, ​1968

Bill Acquavella at Four Masters of Impressionism, 1968.

Four masters of Impressionism

Four Masters of Impressionism, Acquavella Galleries' first exhibition in its new townhouse on East Seventy-Ninth Street, on view October 24-November 30, 1968.

Installation view of Four Masters of Impressionism

Four Masters of Impressionism on view at Acquavella Galleries from October 24–November 30, 1968.

1970s

Now established in its stately galleries on East 79th Street, the gallery continues its tradition of mounting major loan exhibitions by the masters of Impressionism and modern art, presenting these exhibitions nearly each year, with the proceeds from admissions going to benefit nearby New York hospitals. The gallery presents Amedeo Modigliani in 1971, Joan Miró in 1972, Henri Matisse in 1973, Yves Tanguy in 1974, Pablo Picasso in 1975, Pierre Bonnard in 1977, and Edgar Degas in 1978. Renowned art historians and critics, from John Ashbery and Clement Greenberg to Douglas Cooper, Sir Roland Penrose, Theodore Reff, and Robert Rosenblum, contribute to the accompanying publications.

1970s

Picasso

Installation view of Pablo Picasso exhibition, spring 1975.

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Picasso

Installation view of Pablo Picasso exhibition, spring 1975. 

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Picasso

Installation view of Pablo Picasso exhibition, spring 1975. 

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Picasso

Publication for Pablo Picasso exhibition, spring 1975.

Henri Matisse

Visitors waiting to view Henri Matisse exhibition, fall 1973.

Matisse ad

Advertisement for Henri Matisse exhibition, fall 1973.

Catalogue for Henri Matisse exhibition, 1973.

Catalogue for Henri Matisse exhibition, fall 1973.

Degas ad

Advertisement for Edgar Degas exhibition, fall 1978.

Catalogue for Degas

Catalogue for Edgar Degas exhibition, fall 1978.

Catalogue for Amedeo Modigliani exhibition, fall 1971.

Catalogue for Amedeo Modigliani exhibition, fall 1971.

Catalogue for Joan Miró exhibition, fall 1972.

Catalogue for Joan Miró exhibition, fall 1972.

Catalogue for Claude Monet exhibition, fall 1976.

Catalogue for Claude Monet exhibition, fall 1976.

Catalogue for Yves Tanguy exhibition, fall 1974.

Catalogue for Yves Tanguy exhibition, fall 1974.

The gallery’s focus expands to include the wider scope of European modern art, regularly exhibiting and dealing in Impressionism and Post-Impressionism through Cubism and Surrealism. 

In 1973, Acquavella buys seventeen Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works from the collection of Henry Ittleson, including works by Paul Cézanne, Edgar Degas, Amedeo Modigliani, Claude Monet, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, among others. From this collection, Degas’ iconic bronze Little Dancer Aged Fourteen, and Monet’s Camille on a Garden Bench can today be found in museum permanent collections.

1970s

Camille Monet on a Garden Bench

Claude Monet

Camille Monet on a Garden Bench, 1873

Oil on canvas
23 7/8 x 31 5/8 inches
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg Collection,

Gift of Walter H. and Leonore Annenberg, 2002, Bequest of Walter H. Annenberg, 2002 (2002.62.1)

Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas

Little Dancer, Aged Fourteen, 1880

Bronze and tulle
39 inches high
Basil & Elise Goulandris Foundation 

In 1979, the gallery presents XIX & XX Century Master Paintings, beginning a tradition of for-sale exhibitions of masterworks that the gallery continues today.

1980s

In the early 1980s, Acquavella begins working with the Kimbell Art Foundation in Fort Worth, Texas, helping them acquire masterworks for their permanent collection. Over the course of the next fifteen years, the museum acquires over a dozen works through the gallery—including a Cubist portrait by Georges Braque, a Provençal landscape by Paul Cézanne, a self-portrait by Paul Gauguin, a large late painting by Henri Matisse, three works by Joan Miró (a monumental bronze sculpture, a 1918 portrait, and one of the artist’s Constellations), two abstract paintings by Piet Mondrian, and a late Giverny picture by Claude Monet. The Kimbell also purchases several Old Master paintings through the gallery. Though the gallery has become best known for dealing in masterpieces of Impressionist and modern art by this time, Acquavella also continues to deal in the Old Master market.

1980s

Piet Mondrian  Abstraction, 1939-42

Piet Mondrian

Abstraction, 1939-42

Oil on canvas, 29 1/2 x 26 3/4 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

HENRI MATISSE  L'Asie, 1946

Henri Matisse

L'Asie, 1946

Oil on canvas, 45 3/4 x 32 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

© 2021 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Paul Cézanne  Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir, c. 1895

Paul Cézanne

Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir, c. 1895

Oil on canvas, 25 9/16 x 31 7/8 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Mondrian

Piet Mondrian

Composition, 1914

Oil on canvas, 47 1/2 x 39 7/8 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Joan Miró  Portrait of Heriberto Casany, 1918

Joan Miró

Portrait of Heriberto Casany, 1918

Oil on canvas, 27 5/8 x 24 7/16 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

© 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Georges Braque  Girl with a Cross, 1911

Georges Braque

Girl with a Cross, 1911

Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 16 15/16 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

© 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Joan Miró  Constellation: Awakening in the Early Morning, 1941

Joan Miró

Constellation: Awakening in the Early Morning, 1941

Gouache and oil wash on paper, 18 1/8 x 14 15/16 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

© 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

CLAUDE MONET  Weeping Willow, 1918-19

Claude Monet

Weeping Willow, 1918-19

Oil on canvas, 39 1/4 x 47 1/4 inches

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas

Acquavella also works with other major American and European museums at this time, including The Clark Art Institute, which acquires Paul Gauguin’s painting, Young Christian Girl (1894) in 1986, and The J. Paul Getty Museum, which acquires Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s The Model Resting (1889) in 1984. Over the next two decades, the Getty will continue to purchase work for its collection through Acquavella Galleries, and their later acquisitions include a painting of the Rouen Cathedral by Claude Monet, a striking portrait by Édouard Manet, and a painting from Edgar Degas’ series on the milliners.

1980s

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec  The Model Resting, 1889

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

The Model Resting, 1889

Tempera on casein with oil on cardboard, 25 5/8 x 19 3/8 inches

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (84.PC.39)

Paul Gauguin  Young Christian GIrl, 1894

Paul Gauguin

Young Christian Girl, 1894

Oil on canvas, 25 5/8 x 18 3/8 inches

Acquired by the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in honor of Harding Bancroft (Trustee 1970-87, President 1977-87), 1986 (1986.11)

Manet, Portrait of Mme Brunet

Édouard Manet

Portrait of Madame Brunet, c. 1860-67

Oil on canvas, 52 1/8 x 39 3/8 inches

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2011.53)

Claude Monet  The Portral at Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, 1894

Claude Monet

The Portral at Rouen Cathedral in Morning Light, 1894

Oil on canvas, 39 3/8 x 25 1/2 inches

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2001.33)

Edgar Degas Les Modistes

Edgar Degas

The Milliners, c. 1890

Oil on canvas, 23 5/8 x 29 1/2 inches

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2005.14)

The gallery also begins relationships with many Japanese museums—nearly twenty public institutions over the years—helping them to acquire masterworks of Impressionist and modern art. Today, the gallery still works with many of these institutions to acquire works for their permanent collections. Highlights of the gallery’s sales to Japanese museums include: Paul Cézanne’s Still Life with Bottle (c. 1890, Pola Museum of Art); Paul Gauguin’s Girl Herding Pigs (1889, Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art); Alberto Giacometti’s Le nez (1947, National Museum of Art, Osaka); Claude Monet’s La Seine à Rouen, 1872, Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art; Pablo Picasso’s Landscape with Posters (1912, National Museum of Art, Osaka); and Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Woman in Red Dress (c. 1892, Tokyo Fuji Art Museum).

1980s

Paul Cézanne  Still Life with Bottle, c. 1890

Paul Cézanne

Still Life with Bottle, c. 1890

Oil on canvas, 21 1/2 x 25 7/8 inches

Pola Museum of Art, Japan

Gauguin Girls Herding Pigs

Paul Gauguin

Girl Herding Pigs, 1889

Oil on canvas, 28 3/4 x 36 3/8 inches

Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art, Japan

Giacomeet Le nez

Alberto Giacometti

Le nez, 1947

Bronze, 31 7/8 x 28 1/8 x 15 1/2 inches

National Museum of Art, Osaka / © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY

Pierre-Auguste Renoir  Young Woman in Red Dress, c. 1892

Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Young Woman in Red Dress, c. 1892

Oil on canvas, 25 3/4 x 21 1/2 inches

Tokyo Fuji Art Museum, Japan

Claude Monet  La Seine à Rouen, 1872

Claude Monet

La Seine à Rouen, 1872

Oil on canvas, 19 5/8 x 30 3/4 inches

Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art, Japan

Pablo Picasso  Landscape with Posters, 1912

Pablo Picasso

Landscape with Posters, 1912

Oil on canvas, 18 x 24 inches

National Museum of Art, Osaka, Japan

© 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Acquavella begins representing the British sculptor Anthony Caro, together with André Emmerich Gallery. Over the course of the decade, Acquavella will host three shows of the sculptor’s work. The gallery continues its tradition of hosting for-sale exhibitions of Impressionist and modern masterworks, usually at the pace of twice a year.

In 1985, Acquavella mounts a loan exhibition on the work of Lyonel Feininger, coordinated in association with The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., where the show travels. The following year, Acquavella exhibits a selection of drawings by Robert Rauschenberg, signaling the gallery’s continued work with contemporary artists and the growth of its focus to include the masters of postwar American painting and sculpture.

In 1987, Acquavella hosts an exhibition of important paintings by Fernand Léger, including fifty works by the artist which are on loan to the show. The celebrated art historian Jack Flam writes the essay for the accompanying catalogue.

1980s

Installation view of Fernand Léger exhibition, fall 1987.

Installation view of Fernand Léger exhibition, fall 1987. Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Fernand Léger exhibition, fall 1987.

Installation view of Fernand Léger exhibition, fall 1987. Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Leger Install

Installation view of Fernand Léger exhibition, fall 1987. Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Nicholas M. Acquavella dies in 1987, at 88 years old.

1990s

In 1990, the gallery partners with Sotheby’s to form Acquavella Modern Art in order to purchase the entire stock of the Pierre Matisse Gallery. Pierre Matisse, the son of the French painter Henri Matisse, ran his well-regarded gallery on East Fifty-Seventh Street for fifty-seven years, which was known for introducing the masters of modern and postwar European art to an American audience. Including some 2,300 works by artists such as Marc Chagall, Jean Dubuffet, Alberto Giacometti, Joan Miró, and Jean-Paul Riopelle, the acquisition of the Matisse gallery’s inventory sets a record for the art world at the time, both in terms of value and the sheer number of works.

In 1994, Acquavella hosts a major exhibition of paintings and sculpture by Alberto Giacometti on loan from museums and private collections.

1990s

Giacometti show, fall 1994

Installation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Instllation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Installation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Instllation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Installation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Instllation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Installation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Instllation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Installation view of Alberto Giacometti exhibition, fall 1994. Art © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

In the mid-1990s, Acquavella takes on representation of the British painter Lucian Freud, hosting its first show of Freud’s paintings in 1996. From its first exhibition, the gallery sells the monumental portrait of Leigh Bowery, Naked Man, Back View (1991-92) to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The gallery exhibits new paintings by Freud again in 2000, 2004, and 2007. After the artist’s passing in 2011, Acquavella continues to deal in and exhibit Freud’s work, dedicating a show to the artist’s drawings in 2012, organized in collaboration with Blain / Southern Gallery in London, and a loan exhibition of Freud’s monumental nude paintings in 2019, curated by the artist’s longtime assistant David Dawson. During the gallery’s two decades of representing Freud, it places works by the artist in several museum collections, including Nude with Leg Up (Leigh Bowery) (1992, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.); and After Cézanne (2000, National Gallery of Australia); among others. In 2008, Freud’s Benefits Supervisor Sleeping sets the auction record for for a work of art by a living artist in 2008, a title he holds until after his death.

1990s

Lucian Freud photo by David Dawson

Lucian Freud and Bill Acquavella with the etching The New Yorker (2006), 2005, photographed by David Dawson.

Art © David Dawson / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5 – May 24, 2019.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5–May 24, 2019. Left to right: Irish Woman on a Bed, 2003-04, Lent by Private Collection; Sunny Morning—Eight Legs, 1997, Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago; Joseph Winterbotham Collection (1997.561); Portrait on Gray Cover, 1996, Lent by Private Collection; Leigh Bowery (Seated), 1990, Lent by Private Collection; Eli and David, 2005-06, Lent by Private Collection; Naked Portrait with Green Chair, 1999, Lent by Private Collection. Photo by Kent Pell. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Freud Nude with Leg Up

Lucian Freud

Nude with Leg Up (Leigh Bowery), 1992

Oil on canvas, 72 x 90 inches

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Joseph H. Hirshhorn Purchase Fund, 1993 (93.7)

© The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images

Lucian Freud

Lucian Freud

Naked Man, Back View, 1991-92

Oil on canvas, 72 1/4 x 54 1/8 inches

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Purchase, Lila Acheson Wallace Gift, 1993 (1993.71)

© The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5 – May 24, 2019.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5–May 24, 2019. Left to right: Sunny Morning—Eight Legs, 1997, Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago; Joseph Winterbotham Collection (1997.561); Portrait on Gray Cover, 1996, Lent by Private Collection; Leigh Bowery (Seated), 1990, Lent by Private Collection. Photo by Kent Pell. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5 – May 24, 2019.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5–May 24, 2019. Left to right: Benefits Supervisor Sleeping, 1995, Lent by Private Collection; Naked Solicitor, 2003, Lent by Private Collection; Ria, Naked Portrait, 2006-07, Lent by Private Collection. Photo by Kent Pell. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, April 10 - May 19, 2000. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Paintings and Etchings, April 28–May 27, 2004. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Lucian Freud with Bill Acquavella

Lucian Freud and Bill Acquavella with Eli and Portrait of the Hound, 2011, photographed by David Dawson. Art © David Dawson / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, April 10 - May 19, 2000. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, April 10–May 19, 2000. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, 2000

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, April 10–May 19, 2000. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Lucian Freud  Painter Working, Reflection, 1993

Lucian Freud

Painter Working, Reflection, 1993

Oil on canvas
40 x 32 1/4 inches
Private Collection

© The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5 – May 24, 2019.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Monumental at Acquavella Galleries from April 5–May 24, 2019. Left to right: Sleeping by the Lion Carpet, 1995-96, Lent by The Lewis Collection; Irish Woman on a Bed, 2003-04, Lent by Private Collection; Sunny Morning—Eight Legs, 1997, Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago; Joseph Winterbotham Collection (1997.561).

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © The Lucian Freud Archive / Bridgeman Images.

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, 2006

Installation view of Lucian Freud: Recent Work, November 2–December 20, 2006.

Text 3

Eleanor, Alexander, and Nicholas Acquavella.

Photo by Kristine Larsen.

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, the third generation of the Acquavella family begins working at the gallery. Eleanor Acquavella begins working alongside her father in 1997, and her brothers Nicholas and Alexander join in 2000 and 2003, respectively. 

In the fall of 1999, Acquavella presents the loan exhibition Cézanne Watercolors. The art historian and curator William Rubin contributes an essay to the accompanying exhibition catalogue.

1990s

Paul Cézanne  Le Dessert, 1900-06

Paul Cézanne

Le Dessert, 1900-06

Pencil and watercolor on white paper, 18 1/2 x 24 inches
Private Collection

2000s

The gallery begins representing the American Pop painter James Rosenquist, holding its first exhibition dedicated to the artist, James Rosenquist: Monochromes, in 2005. Over the next seven years, the gallery mounts four additional shows on Rosenquist: Time Blades (2007), The Hole in the Middle of the Clock and The Hole in the Wallpaper (2010), Multiverse You Are, I Am (2012), and the loan exhibition of early paintings, His American Life (2018). The gallery places work by the artist in important public collections, including the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Guggenheim Abu Dhabi.

2000s

Installation view of James Rosenquist: His American Life, October 25 - December 7, 2018. © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of James Rosenquist: His American Life, October 25–December 7, 2018. 

James Rosenquist, Untitled (Between Mind and Pointer), 1980, Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Gift of Philip Johnson, 1998

James Rosenquist, Win a New House This Christmas (Contest), 1964, Lent by Private Collection, New York

James Rosenquist, Lanai, 1964, Lent by Ryobi Foundation

James Rosenquist, The Lines Were Deeply Etched on the Map of Her Face, 1962, Lent by Romenesa LLC, New York

Art © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Rosenquist Time Blades

Installation view of James Rosenquist: Time Blades, October 30–December 13, 2007. 

Art © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

James Rosenquist  White Bread, 1964

James Rosenquist

White Bread, 1964

Oil on canvas, 54 x 60 inches (137.2 x 152.4 cm)

National Gallery of Art, Washington; Richard S. Zeisler Fund

© Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York

Installation view of James Rosenquist: His American Life, October 25 - December 7, 2018. © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of James Rosenquist: His American Life, October 25–December 7, 2018. 

James Rosenquist, 1, 2, 3, Outside, 1963, Lent by Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, Gift from the Gene Swenson Collection

James Rosenquist, In the Red, 1962, Lent by Private Collection, New York

James Rosenquist, Spaghetti and Spaghetti (Grisaille), 1965, Lent by Private Collection, New York

James Rosenquist, Untitled (Between Mind and Pointer), 1980, Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Gift of Philip Johnson, 1998

James Rosenquist, Win a New House This Christmas (Contest), 1964, Lent by Private Collection, New York

James Rosenquist, Lanai, 1964, Lent by Ryobi Foundation

Art © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of James Rosenquist, Multiverse You Are, I Am, September 10 - October 13, 2012.

Installation view of James Rosenquist, Multiverse You Are, I Am, September 10–October 13, 2012.

Art © Estate of James Rosenquist / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

In 2003, the gallery takes on representation of the American painter Damian Loeb, exhibiting the artist’s paintings in Synesthesia, Parataxic Distortion and The Shadow (2008), Verschränkung and The Uncertainty Principle (2011), Sol-D (2014), Sgr A* (2017), and All Hope is Lost (2019). 

2000s

Installation view of Damian Loeb: Sgr A* at Acquavella Galleries from March 3 - April 4, 2017.

Installation view of Damian Loeb: Sgr A* at Acquavella Galleries from March 3–April 4, 2017.

Damian Loeb  Scorpius, 2016

Damian Loeb

Scorpius, 2016

Oil on linen, 60 x 60 inches

Private Collection

Damian Loeb, Sol-D, FEBRUARY 28 – APRIL 10, 2014

Installation view of Damian Loeb: Sol-d, February 28–April 10, 2014.

Damian Loeb, The Great Rift

Damian Loeb

The Great Rift, 2014

Oil on linen, 72 x 72 inches

Private Collection

Damian Loeb

Installation view of Damian Loeb: Verschränkung and The Uncertainty Principle, May 5–June 16, 2011.

Damian Loeb

Damian Loeb

Say Hello to the Angels, 2010

Oil on linen, 48 x 48 inches

Private Collection

The gallery continues to mount major loan exhibitions over the course of the decade, including 20th Century Sculpture (2003), Manolo Millares (2006), Fausto Melotti (curated by Elena Geuna in 2008), and Picasso’s Marie-Thérèse (2008), in addition to for-sale exhibitions. 

2000s

Installation view of Picasso's Marie-Thérèse, October 14 - November 28, 2008. Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view of Picasso's Marie-Thérèse, October 14–November 28, 2008.

Sculpture of a Head: Marie-Thérèse, Lent by Fondation Beyeler, Riehen/Basel

Bust of a Woman, Lent by Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Klapper

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

20th Century Sculpture, Picasso, Melotti

Installation view of 20th Century Sculpture, April 3–May 21, 2003. Art © 2021 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view

Installation view of Picasso's Marie-Thérèse, October 14–November 28, 2008. Left to right:

Seated Bather, Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund

The Yellow Belt: Marie-Therese, Lent by Private Collection, Europe

Repose, Lent by The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Collection

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Pablo Picasso  Le Rêve, 1932

Pablo Picasso

Le Rêve, 1932

Oil on canvas, 51 x 38 inches
Private Collection
© 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view of Fausto Melotti

Installation view of Fausto Melotti, April 16–June 13, 2008.

Installation view of Picasso's Marie-Therese

Installation view of Picasso's Marie-Thérèse, October 14–November 28, 2008. Left to Right: 

Le Rêve, Lent by Private Collection

Nude Woman in a Red Armchair, Lent by: Tate: Purchased 1953

Reclining Female Nude, Lent by The Steven and Alexandra Cohen Collection

Seated Woman near a Window, Lent by European Private Collection

Art © 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view of 20th Century Sculpture, April 3 - May 21, 2003.

Installation view of 20th Century Sculpture, April 3–May 21, 2003. Art © 2021 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York and © Alberto Giacometti Estate / Licensed by VAGA and ARS, New York, NY.

Installation view of Fausto Melotti, April 16 - June 13, 2008.

 Installation view of Fausto Melotti, April 16–June 13, 2008.

Installation view of Fausto Melotti, April 16 - June 13, 2008.

Installation view of Fausto Melotti, April 16–June 13, 2008.

In 2008, Acquavella hires the celebrated architect Annabelle Selldorf to undertake a renovation of its galleries, maintaining many of the building’s historical details while also updating and expanding its first-floor galleries.

2010s

The gallery mounts a series of major loan exhibitions throughout the decade, starting with Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, curated by Judith Goldman, in 2010. Known as “the Mom and Pop of Pop,” the Sculls were pioneering collectors of contemporary art in the 1960s, acquiring masterworks by James Rosenquist, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns, among others, very early on in their careers. The show includes forty-four works by twenty-three artists, borrowing several works from important museum collections. 

2010s

Installation view of Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, April 12 - May 26, 2010. Art © The George and Helen Segal Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York and © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view of Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, April 12–May 26, 2010.

Jasper Johns, Painted Bronze, 1960. Lent by Philadelphia Museum of Art / © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. 

Andy Warhol, Ethel Scull 36 Times, 1963, Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Jointly owned by The Whitney Museum of American Art and The Metropolitan Museum of Art (Gift of Ethel Redner Scull, 2001) / © 2021 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

 

Scull Install Shot

Installation view of Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, April 12–May 26, 2010.

Jasper Johns, Target, 1961, Lent by Stefan T. Edlis Collection / © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Andy Warhol, Large Flowers, 1964, Lent by Glenstone / © 2021 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view of Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, April 12 - May 26, 2010. Art © The George and Helen Segal Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York and © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Installation view of Robert & Ethel Scull: Portrait of a Collection, April 12–May 26, 2010.

George Segal, Portrait of Robert and Ethel Scull, 1956, Lent by Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art, Nagoya / Art © The George and Helen Segal Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York

Jasper Johns, Double Flag, 1962, Lent by Irma and Norman Braman, Miami / © 2021 Jasper Johns / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

In 2011, Acquavella presents the retrospective Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, curated by Dieter Buchhart. With over forty major paintings and papiers collés on view, the exhibition marks the first major Braque exhibition in New York in over twenty years. 

The American art historian and curator John Wilmerding curates The Pop Object: The Still Life Tradition in Pop Art at the gallery in 2013, and Fred Hoffman curates Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Collection in 2014, presenting over twenty works by Basquiat on loan from the collection of Herbert and Lenore Schorr.  

2010s

Georges Braque install

Installation view of Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, October 11–November 29, 2011. Left to right:

Bottle, Glass and Pipe, 1914, Lent by Private Collection

Bottle and Musical Instruments, 1918, Lent by Private Collection

Violin and Glass, 1913-14, Lent by Private Collection

Glass and Tobacco, 1913, Lent by Private Collection

Violin and Glass, 1913, Lent by Private Collection, Courtesy Guggenheim Asher Associates

Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

 

Installation view of Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Family Collection, April 30 - June 12, 2014.

Installation view of Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Family Collection, April 30–June 12, 2014.

© Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. 

​Installation view of The Pop Object: The Still Life Tradition in Pop Art, April 9 - May 23, 2013. Left to right:

Installation view of The Pop Object: The Still Life Tradition in Pop Art, April 9–May 23, 2013. Left to right:

Roy Lichtenstein, Black Flowers, 1961, The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Collection, Los Angeles, Art © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Jeff Koons, Flower Drawing (Yellow), © Jeff Koons

Tom Wesselmann, Delphinium and Daisies, 1989/92, Courtesy The Estate of Tom Wesselmann, Art © Estate of Tom Wesselmann / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Marjorie Strider, Red Roses, 1962, Courtesy of Hollis Taggart Galleries

Installation view of Georges Braque

Installation view of Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, October 11–November 29, 2011. Left to Right:

L'Estaque, 1906, Lent by Merzbacher Kunstiftung

The Port of La Ciotat, 1907, Lent by National Gallery of Art, Washington (Collection of Mr. and Mrs. John Hay Whitney, 1998.74.6)

The Great Trees, L'Estaque, 1906-07, Lent by Fractional gift to The Museum of Modern Art from a private collection

Landscape at L'Estaque, 1906, Lent by Merzbacher Kunstiftung

Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Family Collection, April 30 - June 12, 2014.  © Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York.

Installation view of Jean-Michel Basquiat Drawing: Work from the Schorr Family Collection, April 30–June 12, 2014.

© Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat. Licensed by Artestar, New York. 

Pop Install

Installation view of The Pop Object: The Still Life Tradition in Pop Art, April 10–May 24, 2013. Left to Right:

Larry Rivers, Covering the Earth, 1967, Lent by Mr. and Mrs. Larry Magid, Art © Estate of Larry Rivers / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

George Segal, Paint Cans with Wainscoting, 1983, Loan courtesy The George and Helen Segal Foundation and Carroll Janis, Art © The George and Helen Segal Foundation / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Roy Lichtenstein, Still Life with Palette, 1972, Lent by Acquavella Galleries, © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Braque install shot

Installation view of Georges Braque: Pioneer of Modernism, October 11–November 29, 2011. Left to right:

The Mauve Tablecoth, 1936, Lent by Private Collection

Stool, Vase, Palette, 1939, Lent by Private Collection

The Billiard Table, 1945, Lent by Tate (Purchased with assistance from the gift of Gustav and Elly Kahnweiler, the Art Fund, Tate Members and the Dr V.J. Daniel Bequest 2003)

The Billiard Table, 1944-52, Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art (Jacques and Natasha Gelman Collection, 1998, 1999.363.9)

Studio IX, 1952-52/56, Lent by Musée national d'art moderne-Centre de création industrielle, Centre Pompidou, Paris (Dation, 1982, AM 1982-99)

Woman at an Easel, 1936, Lent by The Metropolitan Museum of Art (Bequest of Florene M. Schoenborn, 1995)

Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

In 2016, the gallery presents the exhibition Jean Dubuffet: Anticultural Positions curated by Mark Rosenthal, focusing on Dubuffet’s experimental work from 1943 to 1959, a period the gallery has specialized in since acquiring the Pierre Matisse estate in 1990. 

Working in collaboration with Pace Gallery, in 2017 Acquavella exhibits Calder / Miró: Constellations. Acquavella reunites twenty-two of Miró’s celebrated gouache Constellations while Pace exhibits Calder’s kinetic sculptures from his Constellations series; both of the series were made while the friends were on opposite sides of the Atlantic during the tumultuous years of World War II.  

In 2018, the gallery shows the retrospective The Worlds of Torres-García, exhibiting over sixty works from the private collection of the family of the Latin American modernist. The accompanying catalogues for these loan exhibitions receive additional worldwide distribution through Rizzoli International Publications.

2010s

Calder | Miró Constellations

Installation view of Calder | Miró Constellations at Acquavella Galleries in collaboration with the Pace Gallery from April 20–May 26, 2017. Left to right: 

Femmes au bord du lac à la surface irisée par le passage d’un cygne (Women at the Edge of the Lake Made Iridescent by the Passage of a Swan), 1941, Lent by Private Collection 

L’Oiseau-migrateur (The Migratory Bird), 1941, Lent by Private Collection

Art © 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Dubuffet Install

Installation view of Jean Dubuffet: Anticultural Positions, April 15–June 10, 2016. Left to Right, Top to Bottom:

Dhôtel, July-August 1947, Lent by Private Collection, courtesy Richard Gray Gallery

Cingria blanc sur champ sombre [Cingria, White against Dark Background], January 1947, Lent by Private Collection

Limbour façon fiente de poulet [Limbour Fashioned from Chicken Droppings], August 1946, Lent by Private Collection

Danseuse de corde [Jump Roper], February 1943, Lent by Janklow Collection, New York

La toilette [The Toilette], February 1944, Lent by Private Collection

Quatre leveuses de bras [Four Women Lifting Their Arms], October 1943, Lent by Private Collection

Paysage champêtre [Rural Landscape], November 1943, Lent by Private Collection

Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of The Worlds of Joaquín Torres-García, April 12 - June 29, 2018.

Installation view of The Worlds of Joaquín Torres-García, April 12–June 29, 2018. Left to right:

Arte constructivo universal [Universal Constructive Art], 1942

Composición cosmica con hombre abstracto [Cosmic Composition with Abstract Man], 1933

Eléments universels et le monde de la nature [Universal Elements and the World of Nature], 1932

Art © Alejandra, Aurelio and Claudio Torres, Sucesion J.Torres-García, Montevideo 2021.

Constellations

Installation view of Calder | Miró Constellations at Acquavella Galleries in collaboration with the Pace Gallery from April 20–May 26, 2017. Left to right: 

L’Oiseau-migrateur (The Migratory Bird), 1941, Lent by Private Collection

Chiffres et constellations amoureux d’une femme (Ciphers and Constellations in Love with a Woman), 1941, Lent by The Art Institute of Chicago; Gift of Mrs. Gilbert W. Chapman (1953.338)

Le Bel oiseau déchiffrant l'inconnu au couple d'amoureux (The Beautiful Bird Revealing the Unknown to a Pair of Lovers), 1941, Lent by The Museum of Modern Art, New York; Acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (7.1945)

Le Crépuscule rose caresse le sexe des femmes et des oiseaux (The Pink Dusk Caresses the Sex of Women and Birds), 1941, Lent by Private Collection

Le Passage de l’oiseau divin (The Passage of the Divine Bird), 1941, Lent by Toledo Museum of Art; Purchased with funds from the Libbey Endowment, Gift of Edward Drummond Libbey (1996.21)

Art © 2021 Successió Miró / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Dubuffet Install

Installation view of Jean Dubuffet: Anticultural Positions, April 15–June 10, 2016.

Art © 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of The Worlds of Joaquín Torres-García, April 12 - June 29, 2018.

Installation view of The Worlds of Joaquín Torres-García, April 12–June 29, 2018. Left to right:

Representación Solar—Padre Inti [Solar Representation— Father Inti], 1944

Objet plastique (Madera abstracta) [Plastic Object (Abstract Wood)], 1930

Objet plastique (Barco abstracto) [Plastic Object (Abstract Ship)], 1928

Objet plastique (Escultura abstracta) [Plastic Object (Abstract Sculpture)], 1929

Representación de la Tierra- Pachamama [Representation of Earth-Pachamama], 1944

Representación de la Idea— La Idea [Representation of the Idea—Idea],1942

Objet plastique (Formas policromadas) [Plastic Object (Polychromatic Forms)],1924

Objet plastique (Forme rouge) [Plastic Object (Red Form)], 1930

Objet plastique (Forma blanca superpuesta sobre rojo) [Plastic Object (White Shape Superimposed on Red)], 1931

Art © Alejandra, Aurelio and Claudio Torres, Sucesion J.Torres-García, Montevideo 2021.

In 2011, Acquavella begins representing the American painter Wayne Thiebaud. Its first exhibition on the artist, a retrospective curated by the art historian John Wilmerding, is presented in the fall of 2012, followed by a second survey show in 2014. In 2018, the gallery presents the loan exhibition California Landscapes: Richard Diebenkorn / Wayne Thiebaud, the first show to present the landscapes of these leading postwar California painters, who were also close friends, side-by-side. In 2019, Acquavella exhibits Wayne Thiebaud: Mountains 1965-2019, and inaugurates its new Palm Beach location with a single artist show of Thiebaud’s work in 2020-21.

2010s

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22 - November 29, 2012.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22–November 29, 2012. Left to Right: Drumstick Dinner, 2012; Cupcake and Shadow, 1995-2012; Drink Syrups, 1964, Lent by Private Collection; Food Bowls, 1992-2005, Lent by Wayne and Betty Jean Thiebaud; Two Flavors, 2003, Lent by Betty Jean Thiebaud; Two Donuts, 2003; Peppermint Counter, 1963, Lent by Wayne and Betty Jean Thiebaud; Big Suckers, 1971; Condiment Bowls, undated; Pie Counter, 1963, Lent by Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Larry Aldrich Foundation Fund (64.11); Lollipops, 1962, Lent by Private Collection; Cafe Cart, 2012

Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of California Landscapes: Richard Diebenkorn | Wayne Thiebaud, ​February 1 - March 16, 2018.

Installation view of California Landscapes: Richard Diebenkorn | Wayne Thiebaud, ​February 1–March 16, 2018. Left to right:

Richard Diebenkorn, Berkeley #21, 1954, Lent by Private Collection; Wayne Thiebaud, Fields and Furrows, 2002; Richard Diebenkorn, Ocean Park #40, 1971, Lent by Private Collection; Wayne Thiebaud, Green River Lands, 1998, Lent by Collection of Matthew Bult; Richard Diebenkorn, Berkeley #39, 1955, Lent by Private Collection.

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Art © Richard Diebenkorn Foundation.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22 - November 29, 2012.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22-November 29, 2012. Left to Right:

Two Kneeling Figures, 1966, Lent by Betty Jean Thiebaud

Beach Figure, 2008

White Sand, 2001, Lent by the Artist's Studio

Girl with Ice Cream Cone, 1963, Lent by Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution (Joseph H. Hirshhorn Bequest Fund, Smithsonian Collections Acquisition Porgram, and Museum Purchase, 1996) 

Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: Mountains, ​November 5 - December 13, 2019.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: Mountains, November 5-December 13, 2019. Left to Right:

Mountain Roads, 2010-2013/2019

Rock Mesa, 2010

Road Through, 1983

Plateau, 1969

Cloud Ridge, 1967

Mesa, 1968

Dark Ridge & Clouds, c. 1990

Study for Downhill, 1967

Hillside Trees, 1968

© Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22 - November 29, 2012.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22-November 29, 2012. Left to Right:

River Pool, 1997

Delta Farms, 2001

Reservoir and Orchard, 2001, Lent by Wayne and Betty Jean Thiebaud

Green River Lands, 1998, Lent by Matthew Bult

Island River Farms, 1997, Lent by Private Collection

Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of California Landscapes: Richard Diebenkorn | Wayne Thiebaud, ​February 1 - March 16, 2018.

Installation view of California Landscapes: Richard Diebenkorn | Wayne Thiebaud, February 1–March 16, 2018. Left to Right:

Wayne Thiebaud, Ripley Ridge, 1977, Lent by Private Collection

Richard Diebenkorn, Cityscape #4, 1963/66, Lent by Private Collection courtesy of Van Doren Waxter and Miles McEnery Gallery, New York

Wayne Thiebaud, Urban Freeways, 1979, Lent by Private Collection

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Art © Richard Diebenkorn Foundation.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22 - November 29, 2012.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22–November 29, 2012. Left to Right:

Hot Dog Stand, 2004-12, Lent by the Artist's Studio

Pastel Scatter, 1972, Lent by the Artist's Studio

Hat Rack, 1999, Lent by the Artist's Studio

Shoe Rows, 1975, Lent by Betty Jean Thiebaud

Yo-Yos, 1963, Lent by Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York (Gift of Seymour H. Knox, Jr., 1963)

Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22 - November 29, 2012.

Installation view of Wayne Thiebaud: A Retrospective, October 22–November 29, 2012. Left to Right:

Drumstick Dinner, 2012

Cupcake and Shadow, 1995-2012

Drink Syrups, 1964, Lent by Private Collection

Food Bowls, 1992-2005, Lent by Wayne and Betty Jean Thiebaud

Two Flavors, 2003, Lent by Betty Jean Thiebaud

Two Donuts, 2003

Peppermint Counter, 1963, Lent by Wayne and Betty Jean Thiebaud

Art © Wayne Thiebaud / Licensed by VAGA at ARS, New York.

During this decade, Acquavella also takes on representation of other living artists. In 2013, Acquavella presents its first exhibition of the work of Spanish painter and sculptor Miquel Barceló, exhibiting his work again in the fall of 2016. In 2015, the gallery begins representing Jacob El Hanani, presenting solo shows on the artist’s elaborate drawings in 2015 and 2017. 

2010s

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 27 - December 9, 2016.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 27–December 9, 2016.

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

El Hanani linescape

Installation view of Jacob El Hanani Linescape: Four Decades, October 2–December 15, 2017.

Photo by Kent Pell.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 8 - November 21, 2013.  Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 8–November 21, 2013.

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 27 - December 9, 2016.  Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 27–December 9, 2016.

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 8 - November 21, 2013.

Installation view of Miquel Barceló, October 8–November 21, 2013.

Photo by Kent Pell. Art © 2021 Miquel Barceló / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Alongside its work in the fields of Impressionist, modern, and postwar art, the gallery continues to expand its dealings in contemporary art. Vito Schnabel curates a group show of contemporary art at the gallery in 2013 titled White Collar Crimes. The gallery shows new paintings by Chinese painters Zeng Fanzhi and Wang Yan Cheng in 2009 and 2019.

In 2018, the gallery launches its podcast, “The Picture: Conversations with Acquavella Galleries.” Gallery director Philippe de Montebello leads conversations with preeminent artists, curators, and art historians for the series.

Marron Text

Pablo Picasso

Woman with Beret and Collar (Marie-Thérèse), March 6, 1937

Oil on canas, 24 x 19 5/8 inches

© 2021 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

2020s

In February, Acquavella partners with Pace Gallery and Gagosian Gallery to sell the estate of Donald Marron, handling the sale of some 300 modern, postwar, and contemporary works privately, including paintings such as Pablo Picasso’s Woman with Beret and Collar (1937), and Mark Rothko’s Number 22 (reds) (1957). This unprecedented partnership signals a new way for families to handle the sales of their collections and presents an alternative to the auction houses.

In January 2020, Acquavella mounts an immersive exhibition of bronze sculptures by Miró, Joan Miró: Elements of Nature

The gallery takes on co-representation of the American artist Tom Sachs, hosting its first exhibition in the fall of 2020, Tom Sachs: Handmade Paintings. The catalogue includes contributions by critic David Rimanelli and the writer Naomi Fry. In February–March 2021, Acquavella exhibits new paintings and sculpture by Sachs in its Palm Beach gallery.

From May 5–June 18, 2021, the gallery presents two exhibitions: the loan show, Eva Hesse / Hannah Wilke: Erotic Abstraction, curated by Eleanor Nairne of the Barbican Art Gallery, and Jacob El Hanani: Recent Works on Canvas